Autism Awareness Month Q&A

So I’m just going to post a few questions I received and my answers. All answers are my opinion or point of view, not all my experiences will be the same for someone else dealing with autism. No two people with autism have the same symptoms or issues. 

Q: What did you think when you found out he had autism?

A: Surprisingly, I was more relieved than anything because now had a plan of how to deal with whatever was thrown my way. If you are wanting more of my diagnosis experience, check out my past blog post on it. 


Q: How has that changed your life?

A: It hasn’t changed that much. He goes to preschool like other kids but it’s a mild special needs class that works on speech. My life with autism isn’t that much different besides making sure he gets therapy to help in the areas he has delays. 

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Q: Is there anything he isn’t able to do since he’s autistic?

A: Not really. The only thing I can think of is maybe some independent things since he can’t talk too much yet and isn’t potty trained yet. 

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Q: Is he on a special diet?

A: Yes, but very mild restrictions. He can’t have dairy but that is it. I substitute milk with coconut milk and chocolate with carob chips. Cheese is the only hard one since there are substitutes but he doesn’t like the taste. 


Q: How did you know he was autistic?

A: When he was about 1 years old, he was very antisocial, didn’t babble or make eye contact, didn’t play with toys but was fascinated by wheels and light up toys. He didn’t respond to his name or understand simple instructions. Had issues with textures and restrictive clothing. They just seemed odd and I asked to make sure he was ok. Nothing wrong with those behaviors unless they would interfere with his future life. Started therapy and saw major improvements. 


Hope this was informational and thank you all for the questions. Let me know what you thing in the comments!

Happy Easter!! 🐣🐇🐰 
Love, Cloe 💋

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Autism: Dairy Free Diet

Since we have gotten the autism diagnosis, we have researched every option to help with Leo’s symptoms and behaviors. The one that seemed like a simple change that could have a big impact was switching off of dairy completely. 


It was a little more difficult than expected because I didn’t realize that the only foods my son liked to eat was all dairy products. Milk, string cheese, mac&cheese, quesadillas, yogurt, ice cream and chocolate. 

The first two days were rough, he was extra fussy and didn’t want anything. I had substituted milk with almond and coconut milk. No cheese at all or yogurt. There is coconut milk ice cream and carob chips (similar to chocolate), so he wasn’t completely cut from everything. 

By day three, we started to see a difference in Leo’s behavior. 

  • He had better attention
  • Willingness to try new things
  • More vocal
  • Fewer tantrums
  • More responsive 


With the results we saw, we were going to stick to a dairy free diet. So we all have been dairy free since October and I can’t go back. I tried having milk and I got stomach aches. It has helped all of our health, not just Leo’s. 

I would highly suggest anyone and everyone to try removing dairy from their diet and see what results they notice. The time it takes to see results vary from person to person. We were lucky to have some results within the first week but it can take up to a month to start seeing a change. And for some, it may not help at all but it is worth a shot. 

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I hope this was informational and helpful. If you have more questions or comments, feel free to send me a message!

Love, Cloe 💙

World Autism Awareness Day

Today is World Autism Awareness Day and you can show your Awareness by wearing blue.


April is Autism Awareness Month, so for this month I’ll be posting about autism and doing a Q&A for any of you with questions. 

Autism has good stories – thankfully. But it also has its heartache, challenges and tireless effort. I’d like to share both sides to having a child with autism. 

Many people don’t understand autism in the least. I’ve had my share of experiences with people not knowing what it is he has. 

Autism is the least funded disability in the U.S. effecting the most children. 


So, please send me your questions for me to answer and I’ll be posting more soon on autism. 

Love, Cloe 💙

Family Reunion: 100 Years, 5 Generations, 1 Blessed Family

My family is close and we all keep in touch no matter the distance between us all. So it was no question whether or not we would be flying to Texas for a family reunion that was taking place along with my great grandmothers 100th birthday. 

We planned to fly out there a few days before the reunion/birthday to settle in and plan everything. We wanted to make the most out of a 4 day trip without too many complications.

So when it came time to fly, it was my whole family all together on the same flight; this includes my mom and sister, younger brother and niece, my husband and our two toddlers plus myself. It was a large party all trying to rearrange our seats so the kids were happy but had an adult with them. 


Once we landed, my aunt and grandpa were there to drive all of us back to my grandpas place for the night. We all stayed up late talking and just spending quality time together. 

The next day was spent with my grandpa since he wasn’t able to make it to the reunion. We had dinner with my aunt and her kids; we were a huge group considering it was just my mom and aunt with their kids. 

The next morning, we packed everything up and drove from Dallas area to near Waco for the reunion. It was a blast being reintroduced to distant relatives and getting to reconnect with others since we all live far away. 


And lastly, celebrating My great grandmas 100th birthday was an amazing milestone and quite the experience. 

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It was a wonderful trip and will be lasting, loving memories for the years to come. 

Please comment below or feel free to share your own family experiences. 

Thank you 💋

Autism: First Day of Preschool

My son, Leo, started preschool on Wednesday and I was nervous because he has had a hard time with other school like classes. He hates going to speech and cries when therapists show up at the home for ABA. So I was nervous for how he would be with school. 


He was excited to get his backpack on and there was no complaints walking to his class. We had met his teacher prior to Leo’s first day so when he saw her, he ran right up to her and held her hand. 

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Without any given directions he followed her to the door of his class and saw everyone else hanging their backpacks up on the hooks and he did the same. Turned and waved at me and walked into class. 

It melted my heart! I was so proud of his independence and confidence but sad that it was that easy for him to say bye to me! Haha a silly thing but only a parent would understand. 

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It was a strange feeling being without him for a little over two hours but also a little freeing. When it was time to pick Leo up, I was so excited expecting him to ​​be happy to see me. However, I got the opposite response. He held his teachers leg saying “school, school,” and motioning for me to leave. 

Finally got him to leave but he was crying and pointing back at his class. I guess I can be thankful that he really loves school and his teacher. 

Crying because he saw the car and didn’t want to leave school

If you have any funny first day of school stories, please feel free to share them in the comments below. Or if you have any comments or questions, go ahead and comment below. Thank you!

Autism: IEP Process

I’ve decided to share some IEP experience tips and give other parents an insight to what they should expect. 

  • First, be prepared to have many, many meetings so they can evaluate your child. We, personally, had 7 meetings before the final meeting.
  • Second, always remember that you are your child’s best and only advocate. Fight for what you feel your child deserves and needs.
  • Third, have support during this process. This could be your spouse, family member or friend. Makes decisions easier and takes the stress of pressure off of you. 
  • Finally, Don’t feel obligated to sign when presented with their IEP recommendation. You can take it home to “think” about it. I took it home and asked my sons pediatrician and other therapists what they thought and they all thought he should have more time. 

I just recently received the decision of what the school district is offering for my son. They are giving him 1 hr a week of group speech and that is it! I requested to take the IEP home and decide what I think. 

I am going to come back at them with the request for at least 2 hrs a week of individual speech and at least 1 hr a week of OT. 

Once they review my request, they will schedule another meeting and I will find out if they will be adding my request or if they don’t feel he needs the extra time. 

*I will post an update once we get the final decision.*


Please feel free to share some of your experiences or any comment or questions you have! 😁

Autism Diagnosis: Still The Same Family

As many of you may already know, me and my family have been dealing with developmental delays with Leo. Therapists and doctors kept going back and forth between it being just a delay to something more. I have always felt like there was something more than just a delay but moved on and waited for it to become clear. 


This past October, I finally got a clear answer from our neurologist on Leo’s situation. The diagnosis – autism spectrum disorder. I thought hearing a diagnosis would make me feel nervous or sad or fear but instead it was a huge sigh of relief and gave me more hope and determination to do what’s right for my lil boy. 

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This diagnosis didn’t change who he is or who we are as a family. This diagnosis doesn’t define him, it is just another part that makes him who he is. Finally having a direction to go with all the symptoms and behavior is comforting. Before, I felt like I was reaching in all directions hoping something would catch and work. Now, I am able to create a plan of action. I can decide what treatments he needs and get him going on the right path. 

I have a new sense of determination to get organized and get going with treatment to help him. The first thing I decided to give a try since it wouldn’t hurt, was to cut out dairy. From the time we cut it out, two days later his behavior had drastically changed. He was more manageable and more reasonable than before. He was more willing to try to talk and was doing better with his eating habits. We have had him off dairy for about three month now and the results have been well worth the change in diet. 


He is hitting three years old this January so he has been reviewed to be put into preschool to help promote his growth and social interaction. I have such high hopes for Leo but know that disappointments may come. I plan to keep updating this blog with new information on Leo and his journey with autism. 

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If anyone has questions or advice, feel free to send me a comment! I hope this motivates, inspires, and can help people dealing with situations similar to mine. 

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